Category Archive: Microbiology

Aug 11

Space is the place…to experiment

Bugs in Space – ATCC® Microbes are Go! by Lauren Cracknell. Students taking part in the ISSET programme at King’s College, London, have designed and prepared ‘micro-gravity experiments’ using ATCC’s Microbes. The intrepid microbes were launched into space on-board the Falcon 9 rocket and rendezvoused with the International Space Station on 5 June. The aim of …

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May 26

Accurate MIC endpoints with automation

LGC-Anti-infective-drug-development_services

LGC’s drug development team regularly assess new methods to refine and strengthen our existing analytical services across all disciplines.   An old-school stalwart of microbiology testing, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) testing identifies the lowest concentration of a substance that prevents visible growth of a bacterial strain.   The MIC is the bacteria’s tipping point and …

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Mar 02

Celebrating 25 years of Food Microbiology Proficiency Testing

LGC’s QMS Proficiency Testing (PT) scheme began 25 years ago, and had a very humble start in life, originally sharing premises with a manufacturer of under-wired bras! Back then reporting was done on an Analyst Request Form (ARF) which was sent out with the samples and then the data was posted back or faxed in. But …

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Jan 31

10 million people will die of bacterial infections in 2050, and each year after that

  Article by: Ed Siegwart    Antibiotic awareness European Antibiotic Awareness Day (EAAD) took place on 18 November, in the middle of World Antibiotic Awareness Week and reminded us of the shocking statistic that if no new antibiotics are successfully developed then 10 million people will die of bacterial infections in 2050, and each year after …

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Apr 26

In vitro antimicrobial efficacy testing: potential pitfalls and future methods

LGC supports the antimicrobial drug pipeline

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global issue, which already causes significant loss of life and will continue to get worse as further resistance evolves. By 2050, it is anticipated that due to AMR alone, 10 million people will die each year, more than currently die from diseases like cancer.   Antimicrobial drug pipeline One of …

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