Tag Archive: Government Chemist

May 08

How do you give coffee authentication an extra shot?

With a high market value and commercial importance coffee is in the top 10 products most at risk of food fraud. A recent paper by the Government Chemist team at LGC, and the Institute of Global Food Security in Queen’s University, Belfast (QUB), tackles the question of where and how to analytically check the coffee …

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Feb 08

Is food allergen analysis flawed?

Food allergy is an increasing problem for those affected, their families or carers, the food industry and for regulators. The food supply chain is highly vulnerable to fraud involving food allergens, risking fatalities and severe reputational damage to the food industry. It is understood that food allergy affects  up to 10% of children and 2-3% …

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May 04

Food safety: how much arsenic is in my rice?

Ensuring the safety of the food we eat is of paramount importance. Scientists at LGC are addressing a number of measurement challenges to support regulation in the food industry and protect human health which we shall highlight over the coming weeks prior to the Government Chemist Conference, Science supporting trust in food, on 21-22 June 2016. …

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Apr 27

Is food allergen analysis flawed?

The Government Chemist Programme and expert collaborators call on Europe to improve the safety and security of food for people with allergies This Allergy Awareness Week we want to highlight the current challenges with food allergen measurements. Food allergy is a rapidly growing problem in the developed world, affecting up to 10 % of children and 2-3 % …

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Sep 08

World Seafood Conference 2015

Managing director of Michael Walker Consulting Ltd Michael gave a talk on the 8th of September, at the World Seafood Conference in Grimsby, UK which will run between the 5th and the 10th. This conference aims to build on existing partnerships and create new links between the International Association of Fish Inspectors (IAFI) members and …

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Nov 21

Proficiency Testing and the fight against food fraud

The supply of food and beverages is now a massive worldwide industry generating trillions of pounds for producers, retailers and intermediaries. ‘Value’ is generally added at each stage of a product’s life and certain foods or beverages have ‘added value’ as a result of a designated geographical origin or as a result of production using …

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Nov 18

Food authenticity: more than just a question of taste

Whisky

Not any old pie can hold the name of Melton Mowbray pork pie. Similarly, only a pasty made in Cornwall following the traditional recipe can be called a Cornish pasty and only specific bottles of plonk can be declared as champagne. These products have all been awarded special status that protects their name in the …

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Nov 17

The Government Chemist Conference 2014

With a history dating back to 1842, LGC remains home to the unique function of the Government Chemist. Providing expert opinion, based on independent chemical and bioanalytical measurement, we help to avoid or resolve disputes pertaining to food and agriculture in order to protect the public. The Government Chemist Conference, ‘Beating the cheats: Quality, safety …

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Oct 14

A history of butter fraud – but how far does it spread?

Butter is without any question the most counterfeited food. This was the opening sentence at the symposium in Brussels in 1888 and while butter may not be the most counterfeited food today, the authenticity and quality of butters and margarines on sale today still come into question. Back in the late 1800s, analytical chemists and …

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Nov 18

DNA in Food and Forensics

Michael Walker, Science and Food Law Consultant with LGC, recently gave a well received talk on DNA in the McClay Library at Queens University, Belfast. The aim of the talk was to inform and update RSC and IFST members in NI on DNA topics as part of the annual lecture series run by RSC local …

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