Finding harmony in newborn blood spot screening

Every forty seconds, a baby is born in the UK. That’s nearly 775,000 births across the United Kingdom in 2016 alone. It’s important that each of these children is given their best chance at a healthy future from the moment they are born.

Currently, all parents of newborns in the UK are offered newborn blood spot screening, a test which detects nine conditions and inherited diseases, including cystic fibrosis, congenital hypothyroidism, and sickle cell disease. The level of hormones or amino acids in the blood at the time the sample is taken leads to early detection. The goal is to detect and treat conditions before they cause severe developmental problems or unnecessary suffering so children can lead as normal lives as possible.

With the number of infants tested each year and the use of nationally agreed protocols with specified cut-off values, harmonisation of methods across the 14 laboratories performing these tests is extremely vital.  Each time a sample is analysed, it should produce the same results. The cost and time of retesting samples can be great and can cause unnecessary stress to the families at an already challenging time.  Additionally, the network of newborn screening laboratories in the UK should have access to the newest, most accurate methods and data.

This is why we have partnered with Dr Rachel Carling, one of the country’s foremost authorities on newborn screening, and the NHS England as part of the CSO’s Knowledge Transfer Partnership (KTP), a programme that teams up leaders in healthcare with the UK National Measurement System’s lab, including the National Measurement Laboratory (NML) at LGC, to solve measurement challenges in their fields.

Through the partnership, we plan to help create methods and materials that will lead to greater harmonisation and provide a framework within which more analytes can be added to the UK’s screening programme to be able to test for new diseases at birth.

As part of the KTP, LGC’s Chris Hopley and Simon Cowen will be discussing best practice in newborn screening with the network of labs at a workshop in London this week. Together, we hope to help deliver greater efficiency and certainty for these children and their families.

Analysis for Innovators: How we can solve your measurement problem

LGC, in our role as the UK National Measurement Laboratory and Designated Institute for chemical and bio-measurement, partnered with Innovate UK to launch a new funding programme ‘Analysis for Innovators’ (A4I) last year.

The aim of A4I was simple: to solve real problems affecting productivity or performance of UK companies of all sizes using the world-leading measurement facilities available at LGC and other national laboratories (NPL, NEL, STFC).

After the success of the first round, Analysis for Innovators is opening a new round of applications in March to UK companies who wish to take advantage of our expertise, research and development to help solve a measurement problem. And this year’s round has £4 million reserved to fund 12-month projects, with up to £250,000 for each project.

Companies are asked to submit a two-minute video outlining an existing measurement problem, without providing any solutions. This gives us insight in to what the obstacle looks like, the approaches the companies have already tried, and how solving it might change their business going forward.

After watching the videos from last year’s competition, LGC scientists sat down with the competition winners and discussed the problems in more detail. This approach encouraged creative thinking from our scientists and provided companies with access to our experts even if they did not progress to the next competition stage. In fact, feedback from the first round indicated that this stage was itself incredibly useful, and as a result the initial successful outcome of the current A4I programme will be a longer consultancy session with our measurement experts before progressing on to potential projects.

Previous collaborations included developing an assay to continuously monitor cortisol for a wearable device to improve diagnosis and treatment of disease, improving the sensitivity of a novel assay developed to ensure the safety of cell therapy products, and optimising an innovative non-chemical disinfection process to provide a cost-effective system for cleaning water and other fluids.

This programme benefits companies who otherwise would not be able to consult with our scientists, but it also benefits LGC by giving us the opportunity to see the outcomes of the vital measurement work we do every day. Our scientists are at the forefront of measurement technology, so it’s exciting to see how our science can affect and change lives for the better. These applications of our expertise remind us why what we do is important and inspire us to continue.

If you’re planning on applying for the next round of funding, or if you’d just like to learn more about the programme, register to join us at one of the remaining roadshows in February and March. We’ll be there to help share the work of our collaborations and illustrate how our analysis can help solve your problem.